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View Full Version : Best Shocks For TC-3 & NTC 3



Synthetic
07-22-2004, 10:54 AM
I am looking to buy some good shocks for my TC3's and my NTC3's...How about some ideas as to which brand to buy and why do you like them? Thanks..

KTRTS
07-22-2004, 11:11 AM
Lots of people use TRF ones on Schumachers and Losis; they are expensive though :(, and I don't know whether they will fit on the TC3...

HauntedMyst
07-22-2004, 12:42 PM
The Associated threaded aluminum shocks are the best in the industry, why waste time looking at other brands? In 10 years of r/cing, I've never had an Associated shock fail. I can't can't say the same for HPI, Xray or Serpent.

Synthetic
07-22-2004, 02:04 PM
I was told that the Tamiaya shocks are better than the Associateds shocks so I thought I would ask. One thing I have noticed about my Associtated shocks is that after a days racing the shock will not fully extend itself back out again all the way as they did before the day of racing. It seems I have to add shock fluid after every race but maybe that is normal...

NitroBoy24
07-22-2004, 04:18 PM
I would just get the FActory Team threaded blue aluminum ones like HauntedMyst mentioned :cool:

Synthetic
07-22-2004, 04:23 PM
I already have those so I will just use them instead of buying others...Thanks...

TC3Racer
07-22-2004, 04:54 PM
oh yea the Factory Team blue threaded body shocks are the best ones for that car hands down. All aluminum and the threaded body makes them extremely tunable and they work very well.

Synthetic
07-22-2004, 05:30 PM
That's good because I have a few sets of those....Does it make much difference with them if you use the black plastic screw on end caps or the blue metal ones?

studawg
07-22-2004, 06:32 PM
I believe the plastic vs. aluminum shock ends are purely cosmetic. I don't think you're going to notice a difference in performance one way or the other.

Synthetic
07-22-2004, 06:45 PM
I was wondering if maybe the aluminum caps sealed any better than the plastic?

Fidelio
07-23-2004, 12:43 AM
can you use bladders in those shocks?

if possible i'd like to keep the air and oil seperate like in my 1/8th scale buggy for a more consistent shock from the beginning to the end of a run. i'm new to onroad but am having fun. thx for the help. :)

TMS
07-23-2004, 12:54 AM
I was told that the Tamiaya shocks are better than the Associateds shocks so I thought I would ask. One thing I have noticed about my Associtated shocks is that after a days racing the shock will not fully extend itself back out again all the way as they did before the day of racing. It seems I have to add shock fluid after every race but maybe that is normal...

Have you tried to rebuild the shocks. I had a similar problem on my TC3, with one shock rebounding too slowly. It turned out to be a pinched O-ring. You can also try this tool in matching your shocks http://www.rchobbies.org/losi_shock_tool.htm

colinradford
07-23-2004, 04:10 AM
I was wondering if maybe the aluminum caps sealed any better than the plastic?

I have heard the plastic actually seal better than the aluminium ones! :rolleyes:

I run the plastic ones myself.

Synthetic
07-23-2004, 08:34 AM
I have one of those shock tools listed above. My problem is when I use it I can get both shocks the same but then after the race day both shocks won't extend out all of the way. This makes me wonder when it starts doing this...If it is during the first race or not till the end of the mains....It must be that no matter how I try I am still leaving air in the system somehow...

RCHavok797
07-23-2004, 08:48 AM
That is completely normal so don't stress yourself over it.

AreCee
07-23-2004, 01:46 PM
I have one of those shock tools listed above. My problem is when I use it I can get both shocks the same but then after the race day both shocks won't extend out all of the way. This makes me wonder when it starts doing this...If it is during the first race or not till the end of the mains....It must be that no matter how I try I am still leaving air in the system somehow...The Associated shocks were designed to operate properly with a little air in there. That's what's called emulsion shocks. It's perfectly normal to have air in there.

Now what I don't understand is your question about why the shock won't rebound all the way out. It's not supposed to, if it does then it's overfilled with oil. You should only get about 1/8" to 3/8" rebound if filled correctly. The spring will extend the shock for you not the oil.

The plastic caps are fine unless you need to add a little more weight and spend many more dollars for eye candy.

Every now and then you should check/replace the O-Rings to keep the shocks working right.

gtghm
07-26-2004, 01:17 PM
Sorry to but in but I have some shock questions.

What does a properly filled shock respond like?

I guess I don't exactly understand how they are supposed to work.
I thought that they were supposed to rebound all of the way but now I'm thinking that they shouldn't rebound at all.

I have the tool but I am finding that it is very hard to get them the same especially on the contract and expand rate. I certianly could use a good toutorial on shock building and tuning if any knows a link please.

Also, I just bought a full set of GPM threaded aluminum shocks and when I went to change out the stock oil for the weight that I am running I overfilled it and poped a hole in the little diaphram. Can I use any 55mm shock diaphram or do I have to get that exact replacement?

Thanks,
"g"

gtghm
07-27-2004, 12:43 PM
Sorry to but in but I have some shock questions.

What does a properly filled shock respond like?

I guess I don't exactly understand how they are supposed to work.
I thought that they were supposed to rebound all of the way but now I'm thinking that they shouldn't rebound at all.

I have the tool but I am finding that it is very hard to get them the same especially on the contract and expand rate. I certianly could use a good toutorial on shock building and tuning if any knows a link please.

Also, I just bought a full set of GPM threaded aluminum shocks and when I went to change out the stock oil for the weight that I am running I overfilled it and poped a hole in the little diaphram. Can I use any 55mm shock diaphram or do I have to get that exact replacement?

Thanks,
"g"


Anybody?

HauntedMyst
07-27-2004, 03:07 PM
You can use any diaphram, but you may find different manufacturers use different rubber, or have different dome heights, which would effect how the shock operates, though mildly. Its one of those small things were I say stick with the manufacturers part or at least make sure all four are of the same manufacturer.

With my limited understanding, this is how the Associated shocks work (people can correct me where I am wrong. I'm using Associated because thats what I have). The shocks are built for damping any impacts the tires receive. In theory, the piston and oil work to damped the impact, the spring is used to return the shock to it's extended position, however the reality is they both do a bit of each others job with the spring absorbing some of the impact and the oil rebounding it slightly. A well built Associated shock, with out the spring, will rebound the shaft out of the body when pushed all the way in and released. The thicker the oil, the slower the compression and decompression, the thicker the spring, the slower the compression and the fast the decompression. When you build the shocks, you need to make sure that during assemly, the piston is as high as you can take it without losing oil. As you tighten the screw cap on, the shaft will start to push out. If you have the shafts at different lengths when you build them, the rebound won't becorrect.

My advice on shocks is to take an hour and build and rebuild them over and over until you physically get the feel for what they should be like. Some times this can take a few builds but when your done, you'll be glad you went through it. I hate building shocks, but now I can rebuild my TC3 shocks practically with my eyes closed.

Lots of things can impact a shocks performance. Scratched shafts, unlubed o rings, burrs on the pistons, etc. Double check all of those things.

KronicRacer
07-27-2004, 04:16 PM
i like associated's aluminum threaded shock. i also like the unobatanium (sp)? shock shaft AE has for their shocks. makes for a smooth ride. it seems that way atleast :p

Synthetic
07-27-2004, 05:20 PM
I did not know to leave the shock piston at the top of the stroke when putting the cap back on. I have been doing just the opposite and I thought that the shock shaft was supposed to go all of the way back out after being compressed. How far should it extend out to be correct before stopping on its own? Thanks...

gtghm
07-27-2004, 07:29 PM
I did not know to leave the shock piston at the top of the stroke when putting the cap back on. I have been doing just the opposite and I thought that the shock shaft was supposed to go all of the way back out after being compressed. How far should it extend out to be correct before stopping on its own? Thanks...


You hit on my problem excatly... Lots of different information.

I thought the same thing you did. But after thinking about it especially after I poped one of my new diaphrams on my new shock set I realized that I must not be understanding shocks correctly.

Thats when I thought about real shocks. I don't think that real car shocks rebound much if at all on their own. If I remember right some of them come compressed and when you install them you have to pull them apart a bit to get the holes to line up for the bolts.

Some expert should do a little toutorial on the subject...

thanks,
"g"

HauntedMyst
07-27-2004, 08:39 PM
How far should it extend out to be correct before stopping on its own? Thanks...

It should extend the full length but slowly. If you don't have enough oil in there, it won't extend fully. If it shoots out fast, there is too much oil in there.

Synthetic
07-27-2004, 09:41 PM
Ok, that makes sense to me as if it wasn't supposed to come all of the way out then at what point would be enough? Thanks again....

highroller
07-28-2004, 02:46 AM
With Associated shocks use the Greem Slime to coat the rubber and plastic parts and a little to shock shafts. After installing assembled shock shaft in shock body fill it half to 3/4 full work shaft up and down several times to remove and trapped air then fill shock the rest of the way almost to overflowing, add some into the shock cap and install. Hand tighten and check rebound push shaft in - should rebound on it's own to about 3/4 of it's full length. It should be easy to push shaft in - if hard then remove some oil and check. Try to get the rebound and feel the same for the front shock and the same for the rear shocks. You can check the shocks by measuring them with a ruler again after installing springs, spacers and rod ends to ensure shocks are the same length. The shock dyno is a costly item but can be very helpful tool for some.

Most of the information is in the manual, and some of it are things that you learn over the years to keep shocks consistant. If you are having problems with one shock, I'd go back remove or replace the seals completely and ensure they are positions in shock correctly - remove the flashing and check inside of shock body for any irregularities -scratches, misaligned hold or rough areas. Sometimes defective parts do get by.

Synthetic
07-28-2004, 07:50 AM
Thanks Highroller...Some good ideas to check out and give a try!!

DaBear95
07-28-2004, 10:05 PM
The AL caps are cosmetic. However, I am not a good driver and I tried them just to see what they were like. I found that they screwed on quicker/easier and made building the shocks more consistent for me.

Synthetic
07-28-2004, 10:08 PM
Also I would think they would not wear out as easy either.....